REMARKABLE BLOG

At first, the unique landscapes of towering limestone pillars, rainbow-colored rivers, and salt-encrusted thermal pools may be unlike anything you’ve ever seen. However, many of these remarkable places aren’t the only ones in existence. It’s entirely possible that miles across oceans and borders stands an eerily similar landmark that almost looks identical to the one before you.

That means that some of the world’s most iconic landmarks actually aren’t as unique as you think! This list of doppelganger landmarks proves that there can be more than one remarkable place – no matter how strange or bizarre they may look!

1. Salar De Uyuni, Bolivia and Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah

Samuel Scrimshaw/Unsplash and Jake Nackos/Unsplash

The glistening white terrain of Bolivia’s Salar De Uyuni and Utah’s Bonneville Flats are one of the world’s most unique landscapes. With 30,000 acres of thick, white crust, the Bonneville Flats are relatively smaller than Salar De Uyuni (which is the biggest salt flat in the world at over 2 million acres). Both sights are worth the adventure, although Bonneville has one unique advantage – it’s home to an amateur racing track called the Bonneville Speedway.

2. Danxia Landform, China and Tabriz Mountains, Iran

Photo By: Joel Gill/imaggeo.egu.eu) and Tappasan Phurisamrit/Shutterstock

With vibrant reds, golden yellows, and bright turquoise rocks, the Danxia Landform and Tabriz Mountains are some of the most colorful mountains on the planet. The marbling of these vivid colors on both places is due to mineral deposits that have eroded over the past few centuries.

3. Laguna Baltinache, Chile and Siwa Oasis, Egypt

Photo By:  LMspencer/Shutterstock and @mrdivine/Instagram

The contrasting colors of turquoise, reds, and whites make both the Laguna Baltinache and the Siwa Oasis two of the most stunning doppelganger landmarks. Scattered across the somewhat barren terrain are sparkling lagoons and springs, where you can go for a dip and admire the dramatic landscape.

4. Pinnacles Desert, Australia and Farafra Desert, Egypt

Photo By: pxhere and Myousry6666/Wikipedia

Both the Farafra Desert in Egypt and the Pinnacles Desert in Australia have towering limestone rocks and miles of uninterrupted sand. But due to the excess chalk, the geological formations at Farafra are colored white and cream, making it one of the most remarkable and unique landmarks to visit.

5. Kaindy Lake, Kazahkstan and Blue Pond, Japan

Photo By: canva.com and Vasiliki Volkova/Unsplash

The tranquil lakes of both Kazahkstan’s Kaindy Lake and Japan’s Blue Pond look as if there’s a forest submerged underwater. The lush surroundings and towering trees provide a breathtaking background to these bodies of water (although the colors of the Blue Pond are noticeably more vibrant).

6. Roxborough State Park, Colorado and Vasquez Rocks, California

Photo By: Greg Willis/Wikipedia and Hear2heaL/Pixabayunsplash

The distinctly pointy mountains in Roxborough State Park look awfully similar to the layered rock formations in California. While both places are millions and millions of years old, the Roxborough Mountains were formed by magma while the Vasquez Rocks were push up to the surface by the San Andreas Faultline.

7. Twelve Apostles, Australia and Old Harry Rocks, England

Photo By:  MagSpace/Shutterstock and Jose Llamas/Unsplash

Rising from the crashing waves, the unique rock formations of the Twelve Apostles in Australia and Old Harry Rocks in England are two remarkable doppelganger places. While both locations have rocks as tall as 160-feet, the ones in Australia are comprised of eroded limestone, while the ones in England are chalk composites.

8. Pammukale, Turkey and Badab e Surt, Iran

Photo By: muratart/Shutterstock and Samaee/Wikipedia

Ease your aching muscles in the thermal healing pools of Pammukale, Danau Kaolin, and Badab e Surt. With vibrant blue waters, these pools are only found in a handful of places around the world, attracting visitors who wish to soak in their natural, mineral-rich springs.

9. Cano Cristales, Colombia and Tranquilandia, Colombia

 Photo By: sunsinger/Shutterstock and @elviajerocristian and @antonio_galvis/Instagram

Colombia is home to not one but two vibrantly colorful bodies of water. The incredibly stunning Cano Cristales (affectionately known as the Rainbow River) is layered with shades of green, blue, black, and red, while Tranquilandia in Guaviare is tinted a bright pink due to the presence of blooming algae.

10. The Wave, Arizona and White Pocket, Arizona

Photo By: Sehara/Wikipedia and Bob Wick/Flickr

Arizona is known for its narrow gorges and steep fairy chimneys tur, and the beautiful Wave and White Pocket canyons are no exception. Located just 70-miles from each other, both of these identical places have massive swirling sandstorm formations that stretch as far as the eye can see.

11. The Colosseum, Italy and El Djem, Tunisia

Photo By: Zheka Boychenko/Unsplash and Marques/Shutterstock

While the Colosseum in Rome is arguably one of Italy’s most iconic landmarks, Tunesia also has an almost identical amphitheater that was also built during Roman times. While the El Djem amphitheater is a bit smaller, it happens to be the only one of its kind in all of Africa.

12. Fairy Chimneys, Turkey and Tent Rocks, New Mexico

Photo By: Benh LIEU SONG/Wikipedia and sumikophoto/Shutterstock

Dotted along the barren landscape are these bizarre, pointy rock formations. You can see this towering landmarks either at the Tent Rocks National Monument in New Mexico or in Cappadocia (the same region of Turkey where you see those beautiful hot air balloon experiences!)

13. Cherrapunji Root Bridge, India and Jembatan Akar, Indonesia

Photo By: Anya 1984/Wikipedia and Indradi Soemardjan/Wikipedia

As two of Mother Nature’s most stunning doppelganger landmarks, the Cherrapunji Root Bridge in India and the Jembatan Akar in Indonesia are ripped right from the pages of the Jungle Book. These bridges are made from real tree roots and allow people to cross from one side of the river to the other.

14. Horseshoe Bend, Arizona and Moselschleife, Germany

Photo By: Hans Isaacson/Unsplash and fokke baarssen/Unsplash

At first glance, Arizona’s Horseshoe Bend and Germany’s Moselchleife look nearly identical. The curved, looping rivers and jaw-dropping cliffside views are both equally as impressive. The only big difference is the landscape – Horseshoe Bend is located in a canyon while Moselschleife is surrounded by green vineyards.

15. Bowling Ball Beach, California and Koekohe Beach, New Zealand

Photo By: Craig AF Johnston/Shutterstock and jcjv/Shutterstock

As two of the most unique doppelganger landmarks, Bowling Bowl Beach in California and Koekohe Beach in New Zealand are famous for one thing – their larger-than-life boulders sitting right on the shores of the ocean. While it looks like they were left by extraterrestrials, these round rocks were simply formed by water erosion.

16. Badlands, South Dakota and Khizi Mountains, Azerbaijan 

Photo By: Josh Carter /Unsplash and ilkin Babayev/Unsplash

The pink and chalk-colored swirls on the Khizi Mountains in Azerbaijan and the Badlands in South Dakota are so similar that it’s hard to tell them apart. Both places are ideal destinations for hikers, who can see Mother Nature’s remarkable oxidation process at work.

17. Agua Caliente, Arizona and Indian Canyon, California

Photo By: Bill Florence/Shutterstock and Art Boardman/Shutterstock

The oasis-like setting of skirted palms and refreshing natural pools make Agua Caliente and Indian Canyon look like paradise on earth. They both have plenty of activities for outdoor enthusiasts, like hiking, birdwatching, and photography.

18. Rainbow Mountain, Peru and Landmannalaugar, Iceland

 Photo By: Michaellbrawn/Wikipedia and Oleg Senkov/Shutterstock

The ethereal colors painted across Peru’s Vinicunca Rainbow Mountain and Iceland’s Landmannalaugar make these two places some of the coolest doppelganger landmarks. While these two locations are situated halfway across the world from each other, they both make the perfect setting for adventurous hikers and nature lovers.

19. Los Estoraques Park, Colombia and Tianzi Mountains, China

Photo By: chensiyuan/Wikipedia and mundosemfim/Shutterstock

We bet you haven’t seen mountains and canyons like these! Colombia’s Los Estoraques Park and China’s Tianzi Mountains are two identical places with towering columns and pinnacles that shoot straight into the air. The only big difference is the size – the tallest pillar in the Tianzi Mountains is over 4,000 feet high.

20. Cathedral Gorge State Park in Nevada and Red Tsingy in Madagascar

Photo By: Frank K./Wikipedia and Framalicious/Shutterstock

The dramatic peaks and dunes in Nevada’s Cathedral Gorge State Park and Madagascar’s Red Tsingy are two very similar doppelganger places. Over time, both landmarks were eroded by water and harsh weather conditions, leaving the mesmerizing, red spikes and pinnacles that you see today.

21. Semuc Champey, Guatemala and Huanglong, China

Photo By: Jumpstory and EricLiu08/Shutterstock

Located almost halfway across the world from each other, Semuc Champey, Guatemala and Huanglong, China both have some of the most stunning natural pools for swimming and bathing. Both locations are a little off the beaten path, which makes them all the more exciting once you finally reach them.

22. Mammoth Hot Spring, Wyoming and Egerszalok, Hungary

Photo By: pxhere and Geza Kurka Photos/Shutterstock

Whether you’re hiking in Wyoming or trekking halfway across the world in Hungary, you can rest easy knowing there are several thermal pools where you can have a relaxing soak. Take a dip in the Boiling River at Mammoth Hot Springs or enjoy the soothing waters of the volcanic waters at Egerszalok.

 

Did you know that these doppelganger places existed? Have you ever visited a remarkable place that looks identical to somewhere else in the world? Let us know on Instagram! @RemarkablePlaces

 

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